This is the ship that brought David and Rose to America
The crossing took about a week. It must have been rough sailing. The ship was 600 ft long. The Lucania was part of the Cunard line. It was in service 1893-1910.
Reed singing at Frank's memorial
Lyrics can be found in the Tributes, memorials, obituaries section
"Tante Haika" with little Mike, 1943
Haika Cohen Feldman was born Ida Rizher, and was the sister of David's mother Perel. She lived in Philadelphia. David was a favorite nephew. She was always Tante Haika to the family. She was tough and shrewd. When David and Rosa emigrated in 1906, they went to live with Haika.
Jeep donated by the Marion B'nai B'rith in 1948
The local chapter worked long and hard to raise funds for the jeep, which was sent to Israel to help its war of Independence.
Reed and Peggy and a clever Irma doodle, probably 1973
In the den at 1100 Euclid. Irma's doodle seems to be advising Milt not to criticize his son's long hair.
Reed's sweet note to Vicki, on the back of the Reed and Peggy photo
Vicki cherished this advice from her cousin.
The women of Sinai Temple, 1950
Left to right: Barbara Resnick, Irma Maidenberg, Betty Fleck, Stella Keiner, Helen Zimmerman, Dollie Fehr, Nan Maidenberg, Sylvia Greenberg. They were an active, engaged group of women.

The Lucania’s size and history (View PDF)

The Cunard Line’s Lucania was the ship that brought David and Rose Maidenberg to America in 1906. It was 600 ft long. It carried 1,000 passengers in third class (steerage). Its years of service were 1893 to 1910.


A slideshow tribute to Irma Maidenberg, Nov. 25, 2000.

Below is a selection from a show put together for “Thanksgiving Saturday Night” in Marion. Choice of slides and narrative is by Mike. Here is his introduction:

As I was going through hundreds of slides for tonight, I kept coming back to a series that seems to have been taken in the 1940’s. I’m going to begin with them, because in these images we see the lines of poet Dylan Thomas come to life:

And as I was green and carefree, famous among the barns
About the happy yard and singing as the farm was home,
In the sun that is young once only,
Time let me play and
Be golden in the mercy of his means…

Slideshow with narrative
And as I was green and carefree...
...In the sun that is young once only...
Time let me play and be golden...
The family was centered around this house on Fourth Street
And this business downtown
Rose Maidenberg watched over everyone
As did David Maidenberg
Irma's mother Mary Valinet and Milt's mother Rose became close
There were lovely women about: Nan Zimmerman Maidenberg
Jeanne Roskin Maidenberg
The two of them best friends
The men were in their prime: Meyer, eldest of the brothers
Ben, home from the Pacific
Milt, rail-thin, a keen photographer
Frank, the youngest, possessed of a green thumb
1124 Euclid was the scene of family get-togethers
Milt needed a little persuading to start a family
Toby, the first darling baby, came along in 1941
She gave good birthday parties
Which she oversaw so serenely
She grew up fast
Really fast
But eventually took her place among the generations
Milt carried Mike, his first son, born in 1942, high on his shoulders
On the ground Mike would teach himself the finer points of door-roping
Tap-dancing would not take him beyond Marion
Grandfathers Dave Maidenberg and Arthur Valinet carried their charges proudly
Reed came along in 1948, and took his own direction
He helped his mother with little Jolie
And Mary Moore helped Reed grow up
He did his homework
He learned the guitar
He had a sweet ride, a 1965 Mustang
Irma was a beauty in a black-and-white garden
And in the colorful Grand Canyon
She could duke it out with the best
She loved travel with the family and friends, for example to Haiti,
Or just as a couple to Paris
When she came home, there was the yard, the flowers, and Jolie
And friends like Nan Maidenberg and Mildred Roskin,
Marge Maidenberg, Charlotte Resneck, ???, Anna Louise Savesky,
Anne Ganz, Betty Fleck
And Helen Zimmerman, who was always close
Sam and Sylvia Prager of Indianapolis were longtime friends with whom they traveled
And Mother would visit her mother and brother, Stanley at the "farm" in Carmel, Indiana
And so, Mother, we embrace you
We thank you for your tender care of us
And for being there when we needed you most
So---how do you like them apples?
Mother, your children and your grandchildren salute you. We will always cherish your smile, your laughter, and the warmth of your love.

The Sinai Temple shows of the 1950’s

The women and men of Marion’s then-vibrant Jewish community put on their versions of Broadway shows. Ellen Greenberg Kern: “I remember those Temple musicals put on by the talented Sisterhood. I think Nan, Irma and others wrote the plays and maybe changed the lyrics. Sylvia often ‘starred’, belting out those tunes. Song titles like ‘Take Back Your Mink’, ‘You’ve Not heard of Dr. Gonzales’, ‘Life Upon the Wicked Stage'”. The programs were equally creative. Check out “You Can’t Make a Silk Purse__!” with cover art likely by Irma Maidenberg; and “Dudes and Dames” . Both provide cast lists. The Sinai Temple women (and men) put in countless hours of rehearsal. Take a look at the classy photos of the chorus line and other scenes. Mildred Roskin was the producer, piano accompanist and Broadway musical afficionado who brought the shows to life.

A chorus line of the Sinai Temple players, 1958
Left to right: Betty Fleck, Ann Secttor, Tootsie Abel, Annette Klain, unknown, Sylvia Greenberg, Chloe Goldsmith, Irma Maidenberg, Nan Maidenberg, and Barbara Sue Plank. Not shown is the producer and musical accompanist of the shows, Mildred Roskin. Her daughter Wendy comments, "My mom is not in the line up. She was on the piano accompanying them!" Husband Tony adds: "There would have been little or no productions without the Broadway musical knowledge, the piano accompaniment and direction of Mildred Roskin. She was the producer of them all!!--with great help from Irma, Barbara Sue Plank, Nan and others in the casts and back stage helpers."
Cover of program - who could resist seeing it?
More than likely this was drawn by Irma Maidenberg
Belting it out - but what was the play?
Ann Secttor is the singer. On couch behind her, left to right: Sylvia Greenberg, Beverly Ganz, Annette Klain. Nan Maidenberg at typewriter.
The players (though we don't know the play)
Left to right: unidentified man, Barbara Sue Plank, Tony Roskin, Irma, Sylvia Greenberg, Jason Klain, Tootsie Abel, Chloe Goldsmith, Julian Secttor, Nan Maidenberg
A quintet from Dudes and Dames, 1958
Left to right: Ann Secttor, Sylvia Greenberg, Saul Kessler [a guess, based on the program listing], Chloe Goldsmith, Beverly Ganz